Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2012

I bought one of these cool dual-tumbler composters last spring from Gardeners Supply. I’d dutifully made sure to have the right balance of carbon v. nitrogen-based scraps. I kept the bins moist (more or less). They’re positioned to get sun from dawn until mid-afternoon.

So why is it still a bunch of clumpy grass/leaves/kitchen scraps? Anyone?

I’m really at a loss, and running out of time. Need to get this stuff out and into the gardens in about a month or so…

Read Full Post »

Yikes. This is what happens when you get distracted and walk away from a simmering saucepan of simple syrup. Aside from the house filling with smoke, I was about 30 seconds away from a total kitchen remodel. Or at the very least, a new cooktop.

Boiling sugar is no joke. You’ve been warned. ((groan))

Read Full Post »

Yes, I realize that sounds utterly mad, but really, if you go through the trouble of stripping a bed, washing the linens, and making it up with fresh ones, why not take a second to iron the top hem? I have to say straight away that I am very picky about sheets.  It’s not thread count, it’s not the content, but rather, how it feels. I like a crisp, sturdy sheet. Something perhaps a bit institutional as opposed to soft, silky, and light. But that’s just me.

But wait! There’s more!

Read Full Post »

Spring is moments away, it seems, but the produce section of the grocery is still somewhat lacking. If you just can’t face another
plate of mashed potatoes, here’s a low-starch, nutritious alternative: pureed celeriac. What in the world is celeriac, you’re wondering. It’s that Hobbit-like, gnarled brown knob that sits, piled rather anonymously, hiding in plain view, amongst the other winter vegetables at the market. Don’t be intimidated by it’s otherworldly appearance; it is light and gentle on the palate, reminiscent of mild celery, a hint of parsley, and yes, potatoes.

But wait! There’s more!

Read Full Post »

This recipe comes straight from the cookbook “Mama Dip’s Kitchen” by Mildred Council. Ever since I bought this book in 1999, I’ve never made ham any other way.

When buying a country ham, make sure that the ham is soft all over when mashed with your thumb and that the skin is not dry and hard. Allow plenty of time to prepare a country ham. It soaks and cooks for a long while. Use leftovers to make sandwiches and biscuits.

But wait! There’s more!

Read Full Post »

My sense of tidiness and order has been disrupted all winter, looking outside, seeing the gangly mess of rose bushes. I planted a rose garden behind the stone terrace off the back of the house last summer, and I was thrilled with the unexpected riot of blooms my very first year. But now, it looks like hell.

But wait! There’s more!

Read Full Post »

While I was writing up my introductory note to all of you, I was in the process of making a loaf of rye bread. It was going through its second rise, and I abandoned it. Cruel, but true. Remember that guy who ended up taking Rizzo to the dance in ‘Grease’? That’s what it reminded me of: a pock-marked, over-inflated mess full of hot air. Had I gotten up from the computer, walked three paces and put that dough in the already preheated oven, it would’ve turned out perfectly. It’s kind of hard to screw up a rye bread, but I figured out how. That being said, here’s a no-fail recipe that will knock your socks off, and impress the hell out of any eastern European relatives you might have.

But wait! There’s more!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: